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  1. Today
  2. kurt

    Clubs racing

    Just wondering what clubs still have windrush 14s still actively racing and how many. With the view of possibly restarting the nsw association and running state titles.
  3. Last week
  4. MArk Barra

    CAT WANTED

    I can vouch for the Taipan 4.9. (Just happen to have one for sale!) I've sailed it one up for 5 years and they are a very exciting boat. Sadly my local club is withering on the vine so have reluctantly decide to sell. Check out Gumtree or the Taipan association web sites for details of my boat.
  5. Earlier
  6. Mako

    CAT WANTED

    Have a look at a Nacra 4.5. Very good boat for 1 up sailing plus you can easily take another person. Furling jib for easy use. Faster than windrush 14, hobie 14 etc and often beats hobie 16 as well. Designed for crew weight of around 100kg. There is a face book group as well, Search Nacra 4.5 Community.
  7. Need a beach trolley for deep sand. Wide plastic wheels or soft pneumatics preferred. Will refurb an old one if necessary so long as the wheels are OK. Gordon. Safety Beach VIC. 0419 342513
  8. OLOCK

    CAT WANTED

    Thanks Darcy1945, ideally i would like to sail a Hobie 16, my mainconcern is righting it one handed in light air. Does your club have a range of boats that may suit. Also, if you know of any good boats on the market, let me know. Appreciate your reply. Thanks,
  9. darcy1945

    CAT WANTED

    There are 3 local cat clubs, Toukley (Sail sundays) on Tuggerah Lk, and 2 on Lake Macquarie, Speers Pt and Mannering Pk, you should drop in on both clubs before you make any decisions. Both the Lake Mac clubs sail saturdays and details can be found on the net. 105kg is the upper limit for any of the 14s, so a 16 would probably be a wise choice, again advise from a club is suggested. Give me a call, 43591729 for info on Mannering Pk.
  10. OLOCK

    CAT WANTED

    I have just joined the forum. need some feedback on a good cat for me. I grew up sailing Hobie 16's, Windrush 14's and a Bobcat. Now 56 and reasonably fit. Wondering what catamaran to buy to sail on Lake Macquarie. I will be wanting a cat for mainly one up sailing with the occasional sail with 2 on board. I'm 105kg and want to ensure that whatever i get can be righted by one person. I want at least one trapize and something fast and competitive to race if i want to join a club. So far i am thinking a Windrush 14, Hobie 14 Turbo or a Hobie 16. I am unfamilier with the Nacra range. Any feedback and suggestions would be much appreciated.
  11. gmcnee

    Maricat t-shirts available

    shirts $45 still a few available
  12. Pointed Reply

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    Is your sheeting position for the jib right. You should have about equal tension on leach and foot. if the leach is light and the foot loose you will have a baggy sail. Rule of thumb is to measure one third up the sail. Draw an imaginary line from there through the leach/foot corner to the deck. That is about where the sheeting position should be. jib bridle should be 1100, with just small shackles, rack your mast as much as the sail cut will allow, ( the old multicoloured sails don’t allow much),
  13. Prince Planet

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    A Maricat and Hobie 16 are completely different pussycats... there's no point in comparing techniques... When it's blowing 20 knots+, and you're sailing cat-rigged, you will most likely have to do the 3-point 'reverse-tack' 7 times out of 10 - UNLESS you happen to pick exactly the right moment to throw the cat into a tack, and the swell and or waves help push the bows around. In very strong winds (20-25knots) you need to be brutal - or the boat will control you, instead of you controlling it... Above 25 knots it's 'survival' - and personally, it's too scary to be enjoyable... Anyway, you honestly have to 'crash-tack' in 20knots + which usually involves heavy swell and waves. The fact that u r caught in irons and the boat won't steer indicates that the boat isn't tuned properly and/or set-up correctly... AND your timing is woefully off... πŸ˜› Surely there are Maricat gurus who can offer some personal advice here... as a Windrush 14 sailor I can only offer general advice...
  14. Pointed Reply

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    You should make the effort to attend one of the regattas where the NSW Maricat guys will be. That way you can see what they are doing. The next best chance, without huge amounts of travel for you, will be the next NSW/ACT State Titles to be held in Canberra in October or early November.
  15. billygoat

    Halyard pulleys and sail track lubrication

    Took a look at my sail today and found that this has already been done. The bolt rope is hand-stitched about a foot up the luff, and there's a corresponding extra length of generic rope in the bolt rope sleeve. I've unpicked the hand stitching - will see how things move next time I hoist the sail.
  16. billygoat

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    I actually furled the jib when the wind came up, and intended to race cat-rigged. Milling around before the start... it was awful. Just wouldn't steer. I actually rounded up into the wind and "parked" in irons in the middle of the lake, walked out the bow, untied the reef, unfurled the jib and reconnected the sheet. I didn't need the power, but the boat is so much nicer to sail with the jib up. Especially now I know how to depower the jib and keep the bows above the waterline. I very rarely sail cat-rigged. It's like an entirely different, completely unfamiliar boat. I would quite likely have evolved a different rig setup if I had sailed that way more, and hopefully would have gotten better at tacking without the benefit of a jib to pull me around. The Hobie states are on at our club this weekend. Looking at some of the boats in the yard (I don't get to look at many beach cats close up) - at least one of the H16s has a jib halyard led down the mast so it can be adjusted on the fly. Of course, their jibs are fully battened, which changes the rules completely, but I must read a bit more about how H16 sailors trim their jibs.
  17. billygoat

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    This is true, but once the forestay is tight, it doesn't change length much. The sail itself is much stretchier. I had my sail rigged "short", so the luff stretched quite a bit under static rig tension. Then I tried rigging it longer, so the luff didn't stretch as much under static rig tension. Tensioning the mainsheet will, of course, add tension to the forestay, but the wire doesn't elongate to any significant extent, so the jib luff doesn't elongate either. Almost the opposite of mainsail luff tension, I found that a tighter jib luff causes the sail to bag up, and get lots of draft. Looser luff made the jib flatter, which was easier to handle in heavy air.
  18. Prince Planet

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    Simple solution: When it's blowing 20knots + leave the jib on-shore... unless you're 100kgs or more - in which case hang your arse over the rear beam and go for it... All 70's plasti-cats have the front beam too far forward to allow 'safe' broad-reaching in 20 knots + and that's just the way it is - as confirmed above... Sure, tacking is harder without the jib, but the extra power of the jib just isn't needed in those conditions if you're of average weight... Other solution? Sail a Windrush 14 instead - they're MUCH nicer in scary off-wind conditions... The Maricat is basically a Hobie 14 Mark 2... much more user-friendly - but still without the front buoyancy it needs - and that's why the Windrush 14 was so successful - it has a much more forgiving hull shape... Having said that, the really good skippers know how to sail in these conditions - they have their boats tuned properly with the correct mast rake and their trampolines/platforms TIGHT etc - which considerably reduces 'twist' in the structure - thus preventing pitch-poling in all but severe weather conditions.. PP
  19. Looking to source a 7 m maricat mast or similar to detune a Mk5 A class as the 30 foot carbon mast is a scary handful in a typical 20+ seabreeze. I want to keep the A as it is a delight to haul around and to save my aching back, and detune it so its easy to handle in 20+ knots without being out of control . Suggestions?
  20. knobblyoldjimbo

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    You have good adjustment in the mainsheet, pull in hard and tight uphill and the forestays will tighten, let off and it loosens. Bit like a backstay adjustment on lead mines.
  21. knobblyoldjimbo

    Halyard pulleys and sail track lubrication

    I did this with quite a recent sail. I put a short length of bolt rope (the white stuff, Bunnings will probably be ok) into the bottom just to make sure the sail isn't pulled out by the outhaul.
  22. The inaugural Victorian State Titles of the newly re- formed Victorian Nacra Association will be held this Labour Day long weekend at Lake Boga. Weather forecast is looking good. Should be a great weekend of competing mixed classes. Call 0438396029 if you'd like more information.
  23. darcy1945

    Halyard pulleys and sail track lubrication

    Bolt rope shrinkage causes the sail to jam in the track, if your sail has a lot of wrinkles around the bolt rope, you need to ease the luff. There is about 60/80mm of stitches through to bolt rope at the bottom, unpick this and starting from the head, pull the sail down the bolt rope. Most older sails will end up with the bolt rope 80cm up the luff.
  24. The inaugural Victorian State Titles of the newly re- formed Victorian Nacra Association will be held this Labour Day long weekend at Lake Boga. Weather forecast is looking good. Should be a great weekend of competing mixed classes. Call 0438396029 if you'd like more information.
  25. billygoat

    Halyard pulleys and sail track lubrication

    Halyard pulleys sorted. As a stop gap at least. I was in Geelong this afternoon where my "local" chandlery is. Turns out they go sailing Sunday afternoon and shut the shop. Good for them, but I have no plans to get anywhere near a chandlery again, any time soon πŸ˜• Bunnings to the rescue. Sliding door wheels are a lot like mast head sheaves. They all have ball bearings rather than being plain nylon, but there's a heavy duty option that's all stainless in the guts (unknown "heavy duty" polymer in the wheel). 32mm diameter, about the right thickness, fits on the bearing pin. That will do for about $8 a pop. If it seizes, we find plan B. I've read varying opinions about lubricating sail tracks, but universal suggestion is to clean it, which I haven't done. Yet. Ever. Truth be told, there's probably a bit of lake mud in there, especially near the head 🀭. I'll give the bolt rope / luff of the sail a good scrub too. Then I might spray a bit of silicon lube into the mast track, or I might not.
  26. I'm having a terrible time raising and lowering my mainsail. It's just getting stuck. This afternoon I almost couldn't pull the halyard out of the cleat at the mast head to lower the main - I ended up trucker-hitching it off the bow stay saddle for mechanical advantage, pulling all my weight on it, flexing the mast, completely unloading the forestay before it finally moved enough to uncleat. I'm not sure whether the sail is just not sliding in the track, or whether the pulleys at the mast head are stuffed. Well, I know the pulleys are stuffed. They're very old and worn. How big are they supposed to be, to source replacements? Mine look to be 28mm diameter, 9mm thick, with a hole to bear on a 6mm pin. So, with them soon to be replaced - is my sail sticking in the track? I've only sailed in freshwater lakes, so corrosion and salt isn't a consideration, but it's definitely getting harder to hoist. What do I lube the track or sail luff bolt rope with?
  27. billygoat

    Cartwheeling (nose diving)

    A new angle to add to this thread. I've been thinking a lot about jib shape and power. I've tended to have my jib luff as tight as a frogs bum. There is significant slack in the forestay when unrigged - a loop of cable at the head or tack. Rigged up, the sail stretches until the forestay takes the load, which pulls a lot of shape into the sail. Pulling on lots of jib sheet tends to pull the leech tight, still with a big belly in the sail. Also with a tendency to luff at relatively low pointing angles, because there's so much draft so far forward in the sail. So, lots of power in the jib, and difficult to release power because it gets flappy. I think this is what has been driving my bow down the hole. I raced today (mixed class - solo sloop on my Mari, second time racing in about 20 years 😎) in about 20 knots. Usually that would be serious nosedive risk wind, especially in close proximity of other boats forcing unwanted manoeuvres. And some broad reaching legs that give us all nightmares. I loosened my jib luff significantly today. Just snug on the forestay. That gave me a much flatter sail, much less power forward. Pulling the jib on harder pulled all shape out of it and really depowered effectively. MUCH less tendency to bury a bow. Even downwind. This will require more experimentation. I reckon it might be something that needs changing for different wind conditions - a bit tighter in light air when we want more power? But probably not as tight as I have been using. I wonder if this is something that needs to be more readily adjustable than retying the jib. Anyone done an adjustable jib halyard or cunningham?
  28. Cat Ballou

    Trampoline Track

    Thanks Pete, I've done a search on the forum for 'annex' and seems like other members haven't had any issues with using the track.
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