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Bradshaw

Rudder Wire Replacement

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Hi Group

We have a couple of old 14's at our club and am in the process of putting them back together. Noticed the wire in the rudder is broken and just wanted to know the trick of putting a new one in. Also does it need to be wire? Any help would be appreciated.

Regards

Brad

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Give me a call on 02 43591729, it's a reasonably simple job requires some effort and a large vice, or, 2 people.

You may have  to replace, spring, rollers and  tiller plastic joint, as well.

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Hey Darcy can you pleas put up a basic description cause I'm due to do mine as well.

 

My springs and elbows are all good figure  I'll check the rollers when I do the wire?

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If the wire is broken/frayed, you need to get the replacement wire/s to the correct length and swaged - from Windrush.

Don't use anything else - at least I've never seen anything else used.
Then you need to attach it to one end of the rudder spring - and slide the tiller tube over it. Then extend the other end of the spring so it protrudes past the top of the tiller arm.

To do that, you need to place the rudder casting into a vice, or keep it on the boat - and attach a pre-stretched line / strong line to one end of the spring to pull it past the top of the tiller arm. Keep tension on the whole thing by means of that line tied to the 'hook' end of the spring.

Then, when enough coils of the spring are extending out past the top of the tiller tube, get your helper to jam a thin screwdriver through one of the coils - to stop it snapping back into the tiller arm.
Make sure it is jammed in so it's exactly across the middle of the tube.  Be very, VERY careful - as It can suddenly dislodge and become a projectile!
Once that's achieved, the 'hook' end of the spring will be under no tension... and then you will be able to attach the elbow to the 'hook' on the top of the spring - (which is an 'art' in itself...).
If you have a helper, he can watch that the screwdriver doesn't move - coz while doing this part is when the screwdriver will try to 'escape' the coils it's been shoved through... (body armour and protective eye-wear is a good idea!)
You'll find that the elbow has one side where the hole for the spring is angled more easily to accept the 'hook' of the spring.
Once the elbow is attached and in the correct orientation - you can slide the screwdriver out - carefully - while keeping enough tension on the elbow (2-person job usually - but I've done it by myself...)

Then, while the whole system is under tension, slowly (and carefully) guide the elbow into the top of the tiller tube.
Don't forget to make sure the ''uphaul' line is threaded through the middle of the spring - and comes out at the TOP of the elbow joint.
If it comes out at the bottom of the elbow - you've screwed up and need to pull the elbow back out of the tiller tube - which is a huge pain in the arse...
:p
 

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Cheers Prince. That all makes sense

FWIW my wire has failed at the spring end and the wire is intact what is the attachment?

Other thing is the wire is still attached to the rudder box but is very corroded. What is the attachment there?

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The loop of the wire is attached to one end of the spring. The other (swaged) end is inserted into the top of the rudder box - as you've described.
You need to knock out/cut out the swage from the rudder box - and replace the wire/s.

If the system is this old and corroded, it sounds like you should be replacing the springs too…

Nothing more deflating than to be out on a nice day, and find you have no 'kick-up' function - and one rudder casually floats to the surface - coz the spring broke.
And this is a good time to do it. As suggested above, the roller/s may have worn too.
Time for a rudder overhaul methinks… it should be done every 3 to 5 years - which is about the effective life of the springs.
:p

PS
If the crossbar is nearly touching the rear decks - the larger roller definitely needs to be replaced.

And/or, the tiller arm has dropped on the casting. This happens coz some sailors put downward pressure on the tiller arm. That's NEVER necessary.

Cam action locks the rudder into the rudder 'box' - so no downward force is needed. And if you do that - it always results in droopy tiller arms...
So, the cure? I've found that oversized rollers 'lift' the crossbar higher - and any competent machine shop will make larger diameter rollers for you.
The Windrush rudder system is a little more complex than most - but is definitely the most flexible. You can get off any beach in shallow water by dropping one rudder (or both) half-way for steerage - and then lift it/them up - and release down when in deeper water. It's a testament to Richard McFarlane's mechanical engineering background. And never bettered.


 

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Dropped tiller arms are usually caused by wear in the rudder bolt hole, larger rollers are a quick fix. On older rudders with stainless cam straps fitted, a simple fix, is to pack under the cam strap with a strip of plastic cut from an ice cream container. With the rudder in the up position, undo the screws in the strap, insert a strip of plastic cut to fit, refit screws through plastic strip to locate. 10 minutes max without removing rudders. 

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Datz a VERY good tip - I'll use it on my 'classic' W14 ruddahs...
BTW, it's probably a good thing to let people know NOT to use the trampoline as a real trampoline... they also tend to 'drop' suddenly if you do...
:p
PP
 

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On 1/11/2017 at 2:50 PM, Prince Planet said:

If the wire is broken/frayed, you need to get the replacement wire/s to the correct length and swaged - from Windrush.

Don't use anything else - at least I've never seen anything else used.
Then you need to attach it to one end of the rudder spring - and slide the tiller tube over it. Then extend the other end of the spring so it protrudes past the top of the tiller arm.

To do that, you need to place the rudder casting into a vice, or keep it on the boat - and attach a pre-stretched line / strong line to one end of the spring to pull it past the top of the tiller arm. Keep tension on the whole thing by means of that line tied to the 'hook' end of the spring.

Then, when enough coils of the spring are extending out past the top of the tiller tube, get your helper to jam a thin screwdriver through one of the coils - to stop it snapping back into the tiller arm.
Make sure it is jammed in so it's exactly across the middle of the tube.  Be very, VERY careful - as It can suddenly dislodge and become a projectile!
Once that's achieved, the 'hook' end of the spring will be under no tension... and then you will be able to attach the elbow to the 'hook' on the top of the spring - (which is an 'art' in itself...).
If you have a helper, he can watch that the screwdriver doesn't move - coz while doing this part is when the screwdriver will try to 'escape' the coils it's been shoved through... (body armour and protective eye-wear is a good idea!)
You'll find that the elbow has one side where the hole for the spring is angled more easily to accept the 'hook' of the spring.
Once the elbow is attached and in the correct orientation - you can slide the screwdriver out - carefully - while keeping enough tension on the elbow (2-person job usually - but I've done it by myself...)

Then, while the whole system is under tension, slowly (and carefully) guide the elbow into the top of the tiller tube.
Don't forget to make sure the ''uphaul' line is threaded through the middle of the spring - and comes out at the TOP of the elbow joint.
If it comes out at the bottom of the elbow - you've screwed up and need to pull the elbow back out of the tiller tube - which is a huge pain in the arse...
:p
 

One correction to this. DO NOT USE A SCREWDRIVER. Use a flat file or flat piece of steel to hold the spring, as screwdrivers are just asking for trouble.

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"If the wire is broken/frayed, you need to get the replacement wire/s to the correct length and swaged - from Windrush."

I just picked these up from my local Yacht Shop for $22 a set. Just give your local Yacht Shop the details and they can make you up a set for less than buying directly from Windrush.

 

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Listed at $9.79 each on the Windrush online store. Plus delivery - which might be $5.00 - $10.00 max.
What's your time worth? Petrol to and from the local yacht shop? Shame that more sailors don't support the manufacturer - even if it might cost a dollar or 2 more - this is how the manufacturer can afford to keep your boat on the water - by your support...
Please appreciate that Windrush don't sell new Windrush 14s very often - maybe 1 or 2 a year - if that - and when they do, there is no money in it for Brett.
He keeps the class alive becoz he loves the boat - like we do - not as a money-making exercise.
To begrudge him making some profit on parts - well - it's a very sad attitude...

 

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