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Windrush 14 mast rake

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How much mast rake do you use for a Windrush 14?

My specs are as follows: supersloop; foam sandwich, mylar sails, 78 kg skipper, sailing in flat to moderate seas.

Presently the mast is raked to approximately 200 mm behind the stern (measured using the trapeze wire). (I can go even further without compromising the hook to the leach on the main.)

Cheers

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Hi ramShackle. I run the maximum rake, while some carry a little less. My sons boat is set up much the same.

I measure my rake as follows. Take the halyard or long rope from the top of the mast. Measure the length to the top of the stainless steel fitting on the bow (where the forestay clips on). Then measure the distance to the bolt that the rudder rotates on. This length should be about 250mm less than the first.

So long as you have low profile blocks you'll be able to carry that amount of rake.

I sail at Mannering Park on Lake MacQuarie. How about yourself?

Warren, Hot Pepper

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Thanks for that Warren. It seems we were using similar rake, albeit measured in a different way.

What do you classify as low-profile blocks? (I am presently using the standard ronstan blocks that came with the boat.) What is the distance between the anchor point of the block and the bottom of the pulley - or better still, what is the distance between the beam and the boom if you're sailing block-to-block?

In response to your question I'm sailing at Denmark on the South Coast of WA. We have about 8 regulars and a Hobie 16 (sailed 1-up) to keep us honest.

Cheers

JB

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Hi JB,

As per dad's comments we sail with the max rake.

The most common classification of 'low profile' is a 57mm triple ratchet block with a 40mm triple at the top.

I personally use Harken's 40mm Carbo Ratchet Triple and their 40mm Carbo Triple on top, what i save in weight is minimal but i get a more free running system because i also have to use 6mm rope. Whilst in 20+knts this can be hard on the hands, i prefer it.

Are you planning on doing the nationals in Albany, WA? Dad and I are driving over, hoping to bring some others with us.

Cheers,

Michael, Rush 6327

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Michael

Thanks. I turned a few heads using an 8 mm main. They'd think you crazy over here with 6 mm.

Yes - I am planning on sailing the Nationals.

I'm not sure how many from Denmark will go, but I'd imagine a few given it is just down the road.

Happy sailing

JB - ramShackle

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Haha, some think i am crazy but the 6mm sheet does it for me...

Will be good to catch up at the Nationals. Im looking forward to the roadtrip (all 4 and a bit days of it)...

I'll need Rush in peak condition for it, few little maintenance things need doing before its fit to defend the Cat Rig & Supersloop titles...

I've read the rules back to front hoping that i'd be allowed to use a jib downhaul but no such luck...

All sorts of other things i've been looking at doing to it, but unfortunately our rules wont allow it... just like the addition of 25mm to the rear beam... they FLY upwide with it tracking wider in the rear but its not allowed... Steve Miners tried it...

Anyway im sure i'll find something else to tweak...

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Hey Micheal

I was interested to hear the theory behind widening the hulls by 25mm to increase your upwind speed, what does this do for the boat. Could you enlighten me please.

Thanks

Phil

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The windrush hulls do not track straight...

Product spec the stern is marginally closer than at the bows... so you get a funnel effect.

adding the width to the rear beam makes the hulls run more true if even a little nose in so you get more of a V shape. it allows it to cut through the water a bit easier and provide more vertical lift.

But it is COMPLETELY illegal to change/modify the rear beam. You must use the Windrush Production rear beam.

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the biggest that the 40mm Harken Carbon Ratchet tripple can take is 6mm, 7mm is too large for the ratchet pulley.

Best stuff to use is the Lyros stuff 2.2tonne breaking strain in 6mm rope....

[This message has been edited by TornadoSport260 (edited 24 March 2009).]

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Warren,

Hi Martin O' here - could you clarify... the bolt that the rudder rotates on..that is the bolt through the rudder blade? or is it the pintle? 0419 988035.

Kind regrads,

Martin

Originally posted by Hot Pepper:

Hi ramShackle. I run the maximum rake, while some carry a little less. My sons boat is set up much the same.

I measure my rake as follows. Take the halyard or long rope from the top of the mast. Measure the length to the top of the stainless steel fitting on the bow (where the forestay clips on). Then measure the distance to the bolt that the rudder rotates on. This length should be about 250mm less than the first.

So long as you have low profile blocks you'll be able to carry that amount of rake.

I sail at Mannering Park on Lake MacQuarie. How about yourself?

Warren, Hot Pepper

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I imagine you'd have to go slightly further forward with the rig on the racing dacrons (not cut to the shape of the mylar).

Because they produce less power you'd want it a bit further forward to power up the rig a bit more.

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windy 14 hull lift

The windrush hulls do not track straight...

Product spec the stern is marginally closer than at the bows... so you get a funnel effect.

adding the width to the rear beam makes the hulls run more true if even a little nose in so you get more of a V shape. it allows it to cut through the water a bit easier and provide more vertical lift.

But it is COMPLETELY illegal to change/modify the rear beam. You must use the Windrush Production rear beam.

hey fellas thanks for the priceless information to a newbie.....my hulls must have a fair amount of slop in them because the lee? hull lifts appreciably with a sail full of air...i can see the uneven slice through the water at the bow and hear it as well. Is this normal? i would have thought that there would have been some sort of spreader made to stop the hulls from being pulled in at the front when the sails are loaded...any advice would be greatly appreciated...we have a chap with a A Class at our club and he makes us look silly. Need to do a lot of tweeking to chase him down a bit...regards

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If you don't want to look silly against an A then buy an A, otherwise you'll just have to suck it up!

I don't think there should be much movement, possibly the retaining bolts have got loose but don't ask me I haven't got a Windy. My Mari does move slightly, holding my hand against the beam to hull join I can detect slight movement in chop but it doesn't seem to make too much of a difference. Any more though and something must be too loose.

KO

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In regard to mast rake, has anyone measured actual rake in degrees (with a smartphone inclinometer) with leveled hulls. I'm trying to establish stay lengths for raking my standard mast setup and it seems 1.5degrees aft is standard/old setup and approximately 7.5degrees raked aft is max (preferred). If someone could confirm this it would help me out a bunch. 

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Don't get too caught up in measurements - a lot depends on the type of sail - it's age and the set-up - things might behave differently on a sloop-rigged boat for example.

What you're trying to achieve is moderate weather helm when sheeted on hard. You shouldn't be going block-to-block when sheeted in as hard as possible - as that clearly means you have too much rake for that sail and/or sidestay length... but you do want to get close to block-to block - maximum rake - to make the boat perform better upwind...
Of course, more rake means less nose-diving - GOOD - but trickier to tack. (but that's not an issue with the sloop-rigged boat…)

Experiment with the sidestay length until you get the boat 'tracking' well upwind - with enough weather helm... while NOT going block-to-block... but close to it...
Hope this helps...
PP

 

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Don't get too caught up in measurements - a lot depends on the type of sail - it's age and the set-up

 

 

this ...... nothing more, nothing less :cool:

 

 

 

If I set my rig for my Ashby and then run the Goodall up instead then I'm in for a fight and a half, I have to re-set the rake for the Goodall and then change it back for the Ashby.... As for the Irwin, it now has its own mast and shroud setup, the changeover just wasn't worth the grief.

 

Your boat should be set up for the sail you run, after all its the boats "engine" so tune it to get the most out of it ;)  

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